Art            Lip               Welcome                  to my universe
I‘m a: singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist/trumpetplayer, producer/performer, photographer/visual artist, science fiction writer
© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Rhythm I

Rhythm: Rhythmical phrasing and rhythmical refinement and figures are extremely important! Scales will have been learned relatively fast - especially on guitar. Other instrumentalists will have much more work to endure before getting there.. Of course - the keyboarder of today can "just" transpose scales by a clicking in his software. But I recommend to use that means only in cases of emergency :) Our first exercise and prerequisite for ANYTHING that is connected to rhythm: "Hit the One" A player must know where the "1" is. This rule doesn't apply for soloists only - it applies for every musician. The exercises provided as samples here are increasingly getting harder: The faster - the more easy The slower - the more hard The goal there is to hit the "1" - not the 4ths (while it ain't a bad thing to be able to hit them too). Therfore the "1s" in the samples here are marked acoustically. The count-ins are simplified to 4ths in the tempi 60 and 40 - otherwise it might be too hard to master the challenge provided. It is practiced as long as necessary to get to the point where one "feels" the "1". Objective: Hit the "1" exactly in the tempo of 60 BPM. Later in the real solo we will play upbeatly to the "1". To do that - you have to know where it is of course :) Audibles: Hit the "1" at 80 bpm (beginner's exercise):   Hit the "1" at 60 bpm (standard exercise):   Hit the "1" at 40 bpm (master exercise):   Hit the "1" at all tempi (world championship challenge):  

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© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Rhythm I

Rhythm: Rhythmical phrasing and rhythmical refinement and figures are extremely important! Scales will have been learned relatively fast - especially on guitar. Other instrumentalists will have much more work to endure before getting there.. Of course - the keyboarder of today can "just" transpose scales by a clicking in his software. But I recommend to use that means only in cases of emergency :) Our first exercise and prerequisite for ANYTHING that is connected to rhythm: "Hit the One" A player must know where the "1" is. This rule doesn't apply for soloists only - it applies for every musician. The exercises provided as samples here are increasingly getting harder: The faster - the more easy The slower - the more hard The goal there is to hit the "1" - not the 4ths (while it ain't a bad thing to be able to hit them too). Therfore the "1s" in the samples here are marked acoustically. The count-ins are simplified to 4ths in the tempi 60 and 40 - otherwise it might be too hard to master the challenge provided. It is practiced as long as necessary to get to the point where one "feels" the "1". Objective: Hit the "1" exactly in the tempo of 60 BPM. Later in the real solo we will play upbeatly to the "1". To do that - you have to know where it is of course :) Audibles: Hit the "1" at 80 bpm (beginner's exercise):   Hit the "1" at 60 bpm (standard exercise):   Hit the "1" at 40 bpm (master exercise):   Hit the "1" at all tempi (world championship challenge):  

Next

Art Lip                Welcome to my universe