Art            Lip               Welcome                  to my universe
I‘m a: singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist/trumpetplayer, producer/performer, photographer/visual artist, science fiction writer
© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Articulation

Articulation is another word for expressiveness To achieve that we use - phrasing (closely defined in my chapter "rhythm, advanced") - sound - dynamics Scales are learned relatively fast, rhythm mastering and keystroke dynamics are techniques that distinguish a good from a boring solo. A good singer does these things automatically. He/she "feels" them. This is because the respirational system is directly "wired" to the emotional centers in the brain. We look closer at the singer for a moment now - since that is most easy to understand: Everybody knows: - when we are angry, then we are roaring or screaming (our voices get louder, the sound of the voices are grazing dissonnace) - when we are depressed, the pitch and the volume of our voice lower und the sound of it becomes softer - when we are happy, the voice becomes brighter, higher pitched and crisper - if we are in the mood for sex - well- we all know: now the whole bandwith of expression is used. Since these are facts, a singer has a natural advantage in expressiveness - if he isn't a brain-dead zombie at least. Therfore singers are so hard to replace by another instrument: EXPRESSION IS NEARLY EVERYTHING IN MUSIC!!! Players of the wind section benefit from the same basic advantage. They grasp it fast: loudness changes sound extremely. Guitarists, pianists, keyboarders, bassists, drummers: far too often they tootle everything at the same level of volume. Pianists and drummers do that a little less extremely (their instruments are factory-built-in keystroke dynamic), but: mainly you guitarists, you bass players and keyboarders: don't ignore keystroke dynamics! An electronic effects device is a fine thing and very serviceable without question. But it's much less assistant, when it's set up identically all the time. And ever since the invention of the compressor, the alibi of being to low in volume when playing hushed parts of the music is outdated for sure. Bass players: Dead-Notes, bendings, slaps, tappings, flageolets: apply them! "Guitarreros" too of course! I have to admit it: when the monitor sound on stage is suboptimal - then alternatives are vanishing rapidly. Sound technicians, who tell you singers "this is all done via microphone handling by professional singers" and who are adjusting your sound too low on the stage monitor - are idle and incapable. Fire them! The good sound on stage is ALWAYS adjusted to your needs. If some mates in your band are hindering that -  then they must be put less loud. No worry, dear technicians: I am rushing now to repair your honor partly by telling three important constraints of the above bemoaned: 1.The singer must OF COURSE master the important tricks of hand-holding a mike. The distance of the microphone has to be varied with the volume of the recital. This will ease the job of the technician gravely. 2.If the mates from the drum- and wire-sections in the band don't gain controll over their gear - there are drumsticks with differing weights on the market, there are power soaks for the amps etc - then - the outlook will indeed be gloomy concerning the overall concert sound. 3.Regarding the sound for the listeners in the concert room (that is usually quite different from the stage sound): here the masters of the knobs usually are turning the sound purposefully to the shrill and loud side. Especially, if the audience came obviously mainly for beflirting each other or for boozing themselves to coma  - and not for listening to the concert essentially... But the on-stage sound for the musicians - that MUST be top.

Next

© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Articulation

Articulation is another word for expressiveness To achieve that we use - phrasing (closely defined in my chapter "rhythm, advanced") - sound - dynamics Scales are learned relatively fast, rhythm mastering and keystroke dynamics are techniques that distinguish a good from a boring solo. A good singer does these things automatically. He/she "feels" them. This is because the respirational system is directly "wired" to the emotional centers in the brain. We look closer at the singer for a moment now - since that is most easy to understand: Everybody knows: - when we are angry, then we are roaring or screaming (our voices get louder, the sound of the voices are grazing dissonnace) - when we are depressed, the pitch and the volume of our voice lower und the sound of it becomes softer - when we are happy, the voice becomes brighter, higher pitched and crisper - if we are in the mood for sex - well- we all know: now the whole bandwith of expression is used. Since these are facts, a singer has a natural advantage in expressiveness - if he isn't a brain-dead zombie at least. Therfore singers are so hard to replace by another instrument: EXPRESSION IS NEARLY EVERYTHING IN MUSIC!!! Players of the wind section benefit from the same basic advantage. They grasp it fast: loudness changes sound extremely. Guitarists, pianists, keyboarders, bassists, drummers: far too often they tootle everything at the same level of volume. Pianists and drummers do that a little less extremely (their instruments are factory- built-in keystroke dynamic), but: mainly you guitarists, you bass players and keyboarders: don't ignore keystroke dynamics! An electronic effects device is a fine thing and very serviceable without question. But it's much less assistant, when it's set up identically all the time. And ever since the invention of the compressor, the alibi of being to low in volume when playing hushed parts of the music is outdated for sure. Bass players: Dead-Notes, bendings, slaps, tappings, flageolets: apply them! "Guitarreros" too of course! I have to admit it: when the monitor sound on stage is suboptimal - then alternatives are vanishing rapidly. Sound technicians, who tell you singers "this is all done via microphone handling by professional singers" and who are adjusting your sound too low on the stage monitor - are idle and incapable. Fire them! The good sound on stage is ALWAYS adjusted to your needs. If some mates in your band are hindering that -  then they must be put less loud. No worry, dear technicians: I am rushing now to repair your honor partly by telling three important constraints of the above bemoaned: 1.The singer must OF COURSE master the important tricks of hand-holding a mike. The distance of the microphone has to be varied with the volume of the recital. This will ease the job of the technician gravely. 2.If the mates from the drum- and wire-sections in the band don't gain controll over their gear - there are drumsticks with differing weights on the market, there are power soaks for the amps etc - then - the outlook will indeed be gloomy concerning the overall concert sound. 3.Regarding the sound for the listeners in the concert room (that is usually quite different from the stage sound): here the masters of the knobs usually are turning the sound purposefully to the shrill and loud side. Especially, if the audience came obviously mainly for beflirting each other or for boozing themselves to coma  - and not for listening to the concert essentially... But the on-stage sound for the musicians - that MUST be top.

Next

Art Lip                Welcome to my universe