Art            Lip               Welcome                  to my universe
I‘m a: singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist/trumpetplayer, producer/performer, photographer/visual artist, science fiction writer
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Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Intervallic Jumps

"Inside" played intervallic jumps and embellishments The most common appliance of intervallic jumps is of course the moving by using tones of the root scale. Example: C | D | E | F then D | E | F | G and then E | F | G | A etc etc... The above example appeared in ascending form - that can of cause be turned upside down too: descending. And it was in binary feeling: quarters, eighth notes, sixteenth notes etc. If you play groups of three notes instead of using groups of four, then you can also play triplets: triplet quarter notes, triplet eighth notes, triplet sixteenth notes ("6ths", "12ths", 24ths") etc. Chromatic embellishments are also quite common. Generally one can apply all intervals: jumping in thirds, fourths, fifths, Sixths, Sevenths and so on. As mentioned: in an ascending or descending order. Important here: use only tones of the root scale - or you'll get "outside" (sounding "disharmonically"). This hint is especially important for guitarists - fixed intervals are shiftable very easily on the guitar in steps of half-tones ore whole-tones. One can do that. But: one gets "outside" that way. Therefore: The learning curve is admittedly quite steep here - but it's the same on every instrument and that is fair:) Choose your favourite interval and practice it. By the way: the most common intervallic moving uses thirds or goes stepwise like in the first of my examples. Furhtermore: It's recommendable to transpose all stereotypes introduced in the course of the tutorial to every key. It's my advice too, that you build progressions of them, where the patterns change their keys chromatically ascending and descending, whole-tone ascending and descending and in perfect fifths and fourths. Some audible examples are provided here already.

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© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Intervallic Jumps

"Inside" played intervallic jumps and embellishments The most common appliance of intervallic jumps is of course the moving by using tones of the root scale. Example: C | D | E | F then D | E | F | G and then E | F | G | A etc etc... The above example appeared in ascending form - that can of cause be turned upside down too: descending. And it was in binary feeling: quarters, eighth notes, sixteenth notes etc. If you play groups of three notes instead of using groups of four, then you can also play triplets: triplet quarter notes, triplet eighth notes, triplet sixteenth notes ("6ths", "12ths", 24ths") etc. Chromatic embellishments are also quite common. Generally one can apply all intervals: jumping in thirds, fourths, fifths, Sixths, Sevenths and so on. As mentioned: in an ascending or descending order. Important here: use only tones of the root scale - or you'll get "outside" (sounding "disharmonically"). This hint is especially important for guitarists - fixed intervals are shiftable very easily on the guitar in steps of half-tones ore whole-tones. One can do that. But: one gets "outside" that way. Therefore: The learning curve is admittedly quite steep here - but it's the same on every instrument and that is fair:) Choose your favourite interval and practice it. By the way: the most common intervallic moving uses thirds or goes stepwise like in the first of my examples. Furhtermore: It's recommendable to transpose all stereotypes introduced in the course of the tutorial to every key. It's my advice too, that you build progressions of them, where the patterns change their keys chromatically ascending and descending, whole-tone ascending and descending and in perfect fifths and fourths. Some audible examples are provided here already.

Next

Art Lip                Welcome to my universe