Art            Lip               Welcome                  to my universe
I‘m a: singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist/trumpetplayer, producer/performer, photographer/visual artist, science fiction writer
© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Instrumentalists - Specifically

Everything that I have to say about the sub-sections of musicians Specifially I deal with: - blowers - bassists, guitarists - drummers - pianists, keyboarders - singers Blowers The blower attends two years tuition, because he does not want to deal with the downsides of a spoiled embouchure for the rest of his life. That way he unavoidably learns reading music a bit too. If he aims for a big band career or wants to aim at the membership in a brass section, then he'll keep on taking lessons or he enters an amateur big band or a beginner's show band and goes ahead from there. If he aspires the soloist's craftsman career, he can also try to get a "realbook- plumber's" drill. (The realbook is a collection of jazz standards. Most of it's material comes from the 30s and the 40s of the last century). or: he leaves his teacher after two years - the attempts of that friendly gentleman to make him addicted to sheet music - turning him into a helpless fool if someone hides the sheets - are successful in most cases in the long run. Instead of choosing that dull and boring paper-musician-future our candidate works his way through my tutorial and additionally uses ANY material that he can lay his hands upon for practicing soli. After getting versatile in that field, he still has the chance to go back to his academic career. Anyway - one thing is for sure: you become soloist by playing solo. Stand- alone. That's already implied by the Latin origin of the word "soloist". Bassist, Guitarist Similar to the blower's pain who has hurting lips and aching face muscles over the course of the first years, the bassist/guitarist is suffering sore fingertips when he starts. Luckily he acquires horny skin after 6 months at the latest and is quite advanced in his field already at that time. The keyboarder (who at most might have caught a typist's neuritis in that time) is even farther advanced then - but often falls back soon, because he went too smug about himself. The saxophonist is as advanced as the guitarist then. The trumpeter at that time can't even play the whole register of his instrument. Neither the guitarist nor the bassists will disprofit of two years tuition at the start -  ideally taking lessons of a rocker and a jazzer each (otherwise they'd only learn half of the possible).   After that he should know what he wants, know how to learn and be able to avoid the biggest mistakes in fingering. Additionally he knows voicings, backing patterns and rhythms. If he's a guitarist he at least knows the standard chords and as a bassist he can handle Blues, Country and Funk. If he's not such a crack as a funk-bassist he changes to Rock. If he is good at Funk, the doors to Jazz are open for him too. (I view Rock as a mixture of Country and Blues enriched by Heavy Metal and Punk influences. If that appeases you, dear rock fan: academic jazzers are a horror in my eyes). Now our guitarist/bassist could persist in that state of craftmanship and stay within it's limits. If he want's to become a soloist too, he will work his way through my tutorial and additionally use ANY material that he can lay his hands upon for practicing soli. The drummer He either goes and buys a cheap set and fiddles around with that. Drumming never causes harm to anyone - contrariwise it's very healthy. Or: if he is really serious about learning drums, he will take some lessons. As I recommended for the other instruments, he goes one year to a rocker and one year to a jazzer. After that he will rightly be busy practicing his rudiments for years. Somewhere down the road he'll be even able to play the 3-way turned-upside- down scottish multi-stroke-hyper-strike-super-snare-whirl. Allotted over all toms and his whole kit. And - without irony - he will really be able to apply it usefully to his play. The only thing drummers regrettably very rarely learn but really should learn is: to keep silent. Musically. For passages of a track or over a whole piece. Be quiet! No knocking of the beat with the feet, no squeaking of the drummers' seat! Just - hold. If he isn't able to do this, he will never get access to some "higher rites" of his profession. The condition for that is of course: being able to listen:) Anyway -  drummers have a rehearsal room and a big car and they are the best buddies of the lead singer therefore:) Do you master the timing challenge here, master of rhythms? ;) I actually played drums for two years - very long ago. At that time - like many colleagues - I spent a few weeks doing everything with the left hand that I usually do with the right: openening doors, dental hygiene... Everything! That's a good exercise for ambidexterity. I recommend it especially for pianists, guitarists, bassists and saxophonists too. Well - trumpeters and singers certainly don't need it categorical:) Pianist and Keyboarder The pianist definitely takes lessons. Consulting a classic expert and a jazzer - the rest he wins hands down then. The classic mentor teaches him sheet reading and fingerings. The jazzer "really" knows everything about harmonics, scales and voicings. Most parts of my tutorial are not necessary for such a pianist - but only, if he was tutored by a jazzer too. If he spent too much time with the classic master only, he may be able to play Béla Bartók from the sheet - but take his papers away and he'll be left helpless like a child. So - the pianist might take a closer look here:) The keyboarder is a would-be pianist, who didn't draw the obvious conclusions. On the other hand he is good in two also important fields: computers and sounds. If he enjoyed at least some basic lessons, then he might at least not be handicapped by useless fingerings, he handles playing bi- manually and has some basic knowledge in music reading. If he went my way on the keyboard, then he either knows nearly nothing about his instrument - or he is specialized like me. The keyboarder has the best qualifications for creating good sounding compositions. The best candidate for making arrangements is the singer usually.

Next

© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Instrumentalists -

Specifically

Everything that I have to say about the sub-sections of musicians Specifially I deal with: - blowers - bassists, guitarists - drummers - pianists, keyboarders - singers Blowers The blower attends two years tuition, because he does not want to deal with the downsides of a spoiled embouchure for the rest of his life. That way he unavoidably learns reading music a bit too. If he aims for a big band career or wants to aim at the membership in a brass section, then he'll keep on taking lessons or he enters an amateur big band or a beginner's show band and goes ahead from there. If he aspires the soloist's craftsman career, he can also try to get a "realbook- plumber's" drill. (The realbook is a collection of jazz standards. Most of it's material comes from the 30s and the 40s of the last century). or: he leaves his teacher after two years - the attempts of that friendly gentleman to make him addicted to sheet music - turning him into a helpless fool if someone hides the sheets - are successful in most cases in the long run. Instead of choosing that dull and boring paper-musician- future our candidate works his way through my tutorial and additionally uses ANY material that he can lay his hands upon for practicing soli. After getting versatile in that field, he still has the chance to go back to his academic career. Anyway - one thing is for sure: you become soloist by playing solo. Stand-alone. That's already implied by the Latin origin of the word "soloist". Bassist, Guitarist Similar to the blower's pain who has hurting lips and aching face muscles over the course of the first years, the bassist/guitarist is suffering sore fingertips when he starts. Luckily he acquires horny skin after 6 months at the latest and is quite advanced in his field already at that time. The keyboarder (who at most might have caught a typist's neuritis in that time) is even farther advanced then - but often falls back soon, because he went too smug about himself. The saxophonist is as advanced as the guitarist then. The trumpeter at that time can't even play the whole register of his instrument. Neither the guitarist nor the bassists will disprofit of two years tuition at the start -  ideally taking lessons of a rocker and a jazzer each (otherwise they'd only learn half of the possible).   After that he should know what he wants, know how to learn and be able to avoid the biggest mistakes in fingering. Additionally he knows voicings, backing patterns and rhythms. If he's a guitarist he at least knows the standard chords and as a bassist he can handle Blues, Country and Funk. If he's not such a crack as a funk-bassist he changes to Rock. If he is good at Funk, the doors to Jazz are open for him too. (I view Rock as a mixture of Country and Blues enriched by Heavy Metal and Punk influences. If that appeases you, dear rock fan: academic jazzers are a horror in my eyes). Now our guitarist/bassist could persist in that state of craftmanship and stay within it's limits. If he want's to become a soloist too, he will work his way through my tutorial and additionally use ANY material that he can lay his hands upon for practicing soli. The drummer He either goes and buys a cheap set and fiddles around with that. Drumming never causes harm to anyone - contrariwise it's very healthy. Or: if he is really serious about learning drums, he will take some lessons. As I recommended for the other instruments, he goes one year to a rocker and one year to a jazzer. After that he will rightly be busy practicing his rudiments for years. Somewhere down the road he'll be even able to play the 3-way turned-upside- down scottish multi-stroke- hyper-strike-super-snare-whirl. Allotted over all toms and his whole kit. And - without irony - he will really be able to apply it usefully to his play. The only thing drummers regrettably very rarely learn but really should learn is: to keep silent. Musically. For passages of a track or over a whole piece. Be quiet! No knocking of the beat with the feet, no squeaking of the drummers' seat! Just - hold. If he isn't able to do this, he will never get access to some "higher rites" of his profession. The condition for that is of course: being able to listen:) Anyway -  drummers have a rehearsal room and a big car and they are the best buddies of the lead singer therefore:) Do you master the timing challenge here, master of rhythms? ;) I actually played drums for two years - very long ago. At that time - like many colleagues - I spent a few weeks doing everything with the left hand that I usually do with the right: openening doors, dental hygiene... Everything! That's a good exercise for ambidexterity. I recommend it especially for pianists, guitarists, bassists and saxophonists too. Well - trumpeters and singers certainly don't need it categorical:) Pianist and Keyboarder The pianist definitely takes lessons. Consulting a classic expert and a jazzer - the rest he wins hands down then. The classic mentor teaches him sheet reading and fingerings. The jazzer "really" knows everything about harmonics, scales and voicings. Most parts of my tutorial are not necessary for such a pianist - but only, if he was tutored by a jazzer too. If he spent too much time with the classic master only, he may be able to play Béla Bartók from the sheet - but take his papers away and he'll be left helpless like a child. So - the pianist might take a closer look here:) The keyboarder is a would-be pianist, who didn't draw the obvious conclusions. On the other hand he is good in two also important fields: computers and sounds. If he enjoyed at least some basic lessons, then he might at least not be handicapped by useless fingerings, he handles playing bi-manually and has some basic knowledge in music reading. If he went my way on the keyboard, then he either knows nearly nothing about his instrument - or he is specialized like me. The keyboarder has the best qualifications for creating good sounding compositions. The best candidate for making arrangements is the singer usually.

Next

Art Lip                Welcome to my universe